Gracie the Corgi

So You Want A Corgi, Huh?

If you haven’t been living under a rock, odds are that you have seen one of the thousands of articles flooding the internet showcasing my favorite dog breed: Pembroke Welsh Corgis. It’s hard NOT to scroll through Instagram or Facebook without coming across another adorable picture of a corgi, but who’s complaining, right?

Tumblr / Via yurinai.tumblr.com

Who on Earth can resist a Corgi?  With those big ears, stubby legs, and fluffy butt, they are cute as can be.  Pick up a book on dog breeds, or visit a breed-selector website, and you will find that Corgis are incredibly smart, easy-to-train, and are relatively low maintenance in the grooming department. They are loyal to their people, can live peacefully in many different environments, are good watchdogs, and don’t require acres of running room. Toss in a convenient size and the fact that they can be happy in most climates, and they sound like the perfect dog.

But no dog breed is the right match for everyone.  The question is, is a Corgi the right dog for you?   

Here are five things to know before getting a corgi:

1. Corgis shed – A LOT!

corgiguide.com

Get ready to break out the vacuum cleaner because these puppies shed – A LOT. Before you know it, there’s hair on the floor, hair on the couch, hair on your clothes, and hair in the places you never imagined hair could ever be. You never knew a dog could have so much hair! You have that oh-so-fluffy double coat to thank. You better invest in a good vacuum cleaner and Furminator if you’re ever going to see your floor again.

2. Corgis are super smart.

This may sound like a great thing when it comes to teaching them basic commands and tricks like sit, down, and stay. However, you definitely won’t be smiling when your corgi learns that he or she doesn’t have to come when called if they’re not on a leash. Because they are so smart, Corgis can inadvertently be taught many unwanted behaviors and can even learn to manipulate their owners to their advantage. That is why regular training sessions and a firm boundary is crucial for these smart pups!

3. Corgis need regular exercise.

While you may not need a large yard to own a Corgi, regular exercise is a must for these athletic pups! Herding dogs such as Corgis are known to have a high need for both mental and physical stimulation in order to keep them healthy and happy. All Corgis need regular walks and playtime to be happy, but some may need a little more than others to keep them sane. Not only that, but regular exercise is essential for preventing obesity. An obese Corgi is susceptible to a slew of health problems. You better break out those walking shoes!

4. Corgis can be sassy/bossy!

And you thought your teenage daughter was bad! Even the most submissive of Corgis have a tendency to talk back, use “selective hearing”, and bark to demand treats, food, or attention. They require an owner who is calm, assertive, and is willing to set firm boundaries. If you are a pushover, your Corgi is sure to become a spoiled brat. Hmm.. doesn’t that sound familiar, parents?

5. Corgis have a tendency to bark – A LOT!

It’s true that many Corgis make excellent watchdogs.  As herding dogs, one of their historic jobs was to notice anything “different” and alert the owners.  This means your Corgi is likely to bark if the doorbell rings, a car pulls up your driveway, a phone rings, or it’s 5 minutes past his preferred dinner time. If you can’t handle a dog that barks or feels the need to express their emotions via vocalization, then a Corgi is not for you!


If you read this list and found it to be endearing rather than off-putting, then a Corgi might just be the thing for you! 😁 

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